/ Pharmaceutical

A renewed Operations strategy across the Pharma Industry

There is an exciting shift happening across the Pharmaceutical industry around re-thinking the way drugs are developed. This is manifesting itself in many ways: there is continued growth in outsourced research and collaborations, an emphasis on the need to connect disparate systems, and the need for holistic data streams to contribute to machine learning in the R&D process.

We think all of those efforts are great (and TetraScience is playing a major role in each category), but one trend we are really fired up about is re-thinking the role of Operations in the drug development process. And one of the reasons we are fired up is because our solutions are playing a key role in enabling these transformations.

As an Industrial Engineer, I may be biased, but Operations being leveraged as a strategic function (as opposed to just a tactical one) has helped drive enormous and lasting changes across many industries, including manufacturing, retail, hospitality, and travel (to name a few).

Every pharmaceutical company we talk to is starting to think about:

  • Increasing operational efficiency by eliminating bottlenecks
  • Improving resource allocation and management
  • Designing facilities in more intelligent ways

I see three primary drivers of this shift:

1) Strategies evolve fast, but key assets (facilities and instruments) remain rigid

New research developments can rapidly evolve the strategy of organizations. Portfolio managers are re-evaluating the promise of methods being developed frequently, but the key assets in the organization, such as the facilities and instruments, are set up in very static and rigid ways. We are seeing a renewed focus on designing labs more flexibly, optimizing for experimental throughput capacity in the design process, and sharing instrumentation across scientists and research groups. Through our Scheduling and Utilization solutions, customers are re-designing labs in data-driven ways and equipping their scientists with the tools to make sharing instruments possible.

We are seeing a renewed focus on designing labs more flexibly, optimizing for experimental throughput capacity in the design process, and sharing instrumentation across scientists and research groups.

2) Day-to-day operational decisions are disconnected from strategy

Today there is a giant disconnect between day-to-day operational decisions and strategy. This is largely driven by a lack of data. Understanding how to optimize and balance key resources such as researchers and instruments can only be done effectively with key information around instrumentation, people, and projects. This includes understanding instrument usage patterns across teams and programs and time being spent on programs by resources. Our solutions are providing this data to enable an optimization of the day-to-day decisions that need to be made, such as instrument scheduling considerations and prioritization.

3) Excessive waste and inefficiency in the R&D process

Because the facilities and instruments have historically been very rigid, and critical data has been missing in the process, there is a lot of waste and inefficiency built into operations.

Organizations often have:

  • Too many capital instruments
  • The wrong mix of instrumentation
  • Aging fleets that do not meet the needs of scientists

In addition, very important scientific resources are stuck waiting for instruments to become available instead of doing critical research.

By providing both data and tools, we are helping cut the waste out of the R&D process while increasing the efficiency of the organization’s key resources. Request a demo today.

Stephen Marks

Stephen Marks

As Director of Customer Success, Stephen focuses on helping TetraScience’s partners realize operational and scientific value from our solutions. Industrial Engineer, OSU & HBS alum, beer/bourbon nerd.

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